A Wild Place: Sabino Canyon

Right on top of the heels of conference response, WWW member Mary Trimble has written us a post about the Sabino Canyon in Tucson, which she enjoyed while at the conference!

 

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Saguaro Cactus

While recently attending a Women Writing the West conference at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort near Tucson, AZ, fellow writer Heidi Thomas and I took a little side trip to Sabino Canyon for a narrated 3.7-mile tram ride. As we rode in the open-air tram, our driver pointed out the various sites of interest including views of rocky outcroppings, craggy trees, and tough, hardy plants including a variety of cacti: cholla, prickly pear, ocotillo and the great saguaro. We learned that the saguaro can grow to be more than 40 feet tall and that many of the specimens we saw could possibly be 200 years old.

Nine stops along the way allow riders to get out and hike a variety of trails, or have a picnic, then catch a later tram, or riders may stay aboard for the entire trip. We happen to take the last tram of the day, so we stayed aboard for the entire journey. The tram turns around at Stop 9 and heads back down to the Visitors Center.

On our tour, I was surprised to see pools of water as late in the year as October. In spring and summer visitors can even see waterfalls. The Sabino Canyon is a natural desert oasis located in the Coronado National Forest. Sabino Creek gives life to the riparian and desert flora within the canyon. We saw a variety of trees including the Arizona state tree, the palo verde, plus willow, sycamore and ash.

 

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Sabino Canyon

Although I scoured the landscape as we slowly drove by, I didn’t see any wildlife, but the area supports abundant birds, mammals and reptiles. Our driver said that he has seen mountain lion on numerous occasions. Bobcat and coyote have been spotted, along with quails, roadrunners, lizards, and rattlesnakes.

In 1905, the Forest Service began overseeing Sabino Canyon.  During the Great Depression, the bridges over Sabino Creek and the Sabino Dam were constructed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and Civilian Conservation Corporation (CCC).

The Sabino Canyon Tour was a highlight of my stay in Tucson. Tours are available seven days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information call (520) 749-2327, or visit sabinocanyon.org

** If you wish to write an article for our WWW blog, just contact blog coordinator Sara Dahmen at sara@saradahmen.com to submit your idea! **

About Mary

Screen Shot 2017-09-05 at 11.41.55 AMMary E. Trimble, award-winning novelist, has written two memoirs, four contemporary western novels, and over 400 magazine and newspaper articles. Her past is peppered with unique experiences, including positions as purser and ship’s diver aboard the tall ship, M.S. Explorer; two years with the Peace Corps in West Africa; and a 13,000-mile South Pacific sailing trip aboard a 40-foot Bristol. She recently retired after serving 20 years as a volunteer with the American Red Cross and lives with her husband on Camano Island, Washington. For more on Mary, visit http://www.marytrimblebooks.com/

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One Response to A Wild Place: Sabino Canyon

  1. Carmen Peone says:

    I also took the tour with Linda Jacobs and her husband and Jane Kirkpatrick. It was fascinating! I was also surprised to see pooled water. I’d loved to walk it some morning. I bet walking the trail would reveal more wildlife.

    Like

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