Introducing the Agents & Editors

The 2022 Women Writing the West Conference is being held in Oklahoma City in October. Here is your opportunity to get acquainted with the Agents and Editors who will be in attendance this year.

Elizabeth Trupin-Pulli ~ JET Literary Associates, Inc.

Elizabeth Trupin-Pulli celebrated her fiftieth year in book publishing last November, having begun her career in the contracts department of New American Library in 1971. After a brief stint as an editor at Fawcett, she and then-husband Jim Trupin founded JET Literary Associates, Inc. in New York in 1975. As of 2002, their offices relocated to Santa Fe, New Mexico and Vienna, Austria. JET has had great success in the suspense market, most recently with Anne Hillerman’s continuation of her father’s mystery series. Liz is also actively looking for commercial and literary adult fiction and non-fiction. She does not handle sci-fi/fantasy, poetry, how-to books, memoir or material for the children’s or YA markets.

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ISBNs

Being forwarned is forearmed if have published, or are are moving in the direction of publishing a book. In Darcy Pattison’s article, she compares Y2K with ISBN numbers.

Do you remember Y2K? When the century turned from 1900 to 2000, computer programs were in trouble. For many programs, the date had been programmed as 19__ and there was no easy way to re-program it to 20__ or just ____. The book industry is having its own version of a computer programming meltdown.

ISBN – International Standard Book Number

The ISBN is a unique identifying number assigned to a book title/format. That is, each format—hardcover, picture book, ebook, audiobook—needs its own identifying number. The number is tied to both the title and format.

About fifteen years ago, the 10-digit numbers that had been used since the inception of ISBNs was becoming too full. To alleviate this, the industry converted to 13-digit numbers, starting with 978. But they warned that when that series of numbers was used up, they’d move on to 979 and other series.

The problem? Amazon still uses the 10-digit number ISBN number. If you look up your book title for a paperback or ebook, the 10-digit number is encoded into the URL.

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Introducing the Agents & Editors

The 2022 Women Writing the West Conference is being held in Oklahoma City in October. Here is your opportunity to get acquainted with the Agents and Editors who will be in attendance this year.

Lauren Wise ~ She Writes Press and SparkPress

Lauren Wise is the associate publisher at She Writes Press and SparkPress, and the editorial director at SheReads. She has over 18 years’ experience in book and magazine editing and publishing, and in 2009 founded Midnight Publishing, an editorial company that helps authors develop their stories. In 2015 Lauren joined award-winning hybrid publishers SparkPress and She Writes Press, the latter of which won 2019 Independent Publisher of the Year. In 2021 she was elected to IBPA’s Advocacy Committee, and in her spare time, as an award-winning columnist, she is a journalism mentor to at-risk youth.

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Introducing the Sponsors

We are pleased to introduce you to one of this year’s Sponsors of the 2022 Women Writing the West Conference is being held in Oklahoma City in October.

Elk River Writers Workshop

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Women Writing the West 2022 Conference

This will be Women Writing the West’s first-ever conference in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. We would like to introduce you to the Agents and Editors who will be joining us at 2022 WWW Conference. 
Conference Information ~ Register to Attend

Agents and Editors

Malaga Baldi has worked as an independent literary agent since1986. The Baldi Agency is an eclectic agency specializing in literary fiction, memoir and cultural history: work that takes you to places never visited before… Baldi graduated from Hampshire College and lives in NYC. She worked as a cashier at Gotham Book Mart, in the Ballantine Books Publicity Department, as an associate at Candida Donadio & Associates and the Elaine Markson Agency before going out on her own. Baldi believes the strength of the author’s voice and the heart of the story to be key when considering new work. Clients include William J. Mann, Kate Bornstein, Patty Dann, Glenn Kurtz and Kia Corthron. Please check out her website: www.baldibooks.com

Bond Literary Agency is a small, full-service literary agency with a select list of clients. Sandra Bond works with the large houses in New York and mid-sized book publishers all over the country. She was the program administrator at the University of Denver’s Publishing Institute for four years, and she now guest lectures there annually. Sandra is currently looking for adult commercial and literary fiction, smart mystery/thriller/crime fiction, and YA fiction in all categories. She does not represent memoir, romance, science fiction, fantasy, poetry, children’s picture books, or screenplays. She’s also looking for compelling narrative nonfiction, and science for a general audience. These authors must have outstanding credentials: real expertise in their subject area, and some kind of platform from which they can actively promote their books. The Agency has expanded to include Becky LeJeune as an agent, and her interests differ somewhat from Sandra’s, so check out www.bondliteraryagency.com for submission guidelines.

Masie Cochran is the Editorial Director at Tin House. Before coming to Tin House, she worked at InkWell Management Literary Agency in New York, NY. She is seeking the full range of adult fiction and general non-fiction, including memoir.

Jeanne Devlin is the founding editor of The RoadRunner Press, an award-winning traditional publishing house known for its thoughtful books for young and old alike, with a penchant for publishing both new and established Native American voices and those of the American West. Jeanne won her first national professional writing award at the age of nineteen, and went on to win four International Regional Magazine Awards for Best Magazine during her tenure as editor in chief of Oklahoma Today magazine. She is the original editor of 9:02 a.m. April 19, 1995: The Official Record of the Oklahoma City Bombing, a special magazine edition that went on to be made into a book. She has also worked on national marketing and publicity campaigns with the Big Five and for a number of New York Times bestselling authors.

Ben LeRoy has long been fascinated by the power of words and story to connect and expand the world. He is a Senior Editor for Crooked Lane Books and was the founder and publisher of the critically acclaimed publishing companies Bleak House Books (2000-2009) and Tyrus Books (2009-2017) until the latter was sold to Simon & Schuster. During his time in publishing, Ben was a frequent speaker at conferences and routinely interviewed for pieces about the industry. In 2014, after the suicide death of a friend, Ben did volunteer work in all 50 states as part of the Be Local Everywhere project.

Sarah Parke has worked in editorial acquisitions for five years at Globe Pequot Press, and is the Acquiring Editor for TwoDot Books, the American West trade imprint. When she’s not signing books or helping authors polish their prose, Sarah writes her own short and novel-length fiction. She has an MFA from the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, and her work has been published in The Writer, Speculative City, and The Rutland Herald. She telecommutes now from central Connecticut, where she lives in a 120-year-old house with her husband and their menagerie of cats and rabbits.

Elizabeth Trupin-Pulli celebrated her fiftieth year in book publishing last November, having begun her career in the contracts department of New American Library in 1971. After a brief stint as an editor at Fawcett, she and then-husband Jim Trupin founded JET Literary Associates, Inc. in New York in 1975. As of 2002, their offices relocated to Santa Fe, New Mexico and Vienna, Austria. JET has had great success in the suspense market, most recently with Anne Hillerman’s continuation of her father’s mystery series. Liz is also actively looking for commercial and literary adult fiction and non-fiction. She does not handle sci-fi/fantasy, poetry, how-to books, memoir or material for the children’s or YA markets.

Lauren Wise is the associate publisher at She Writes Press and SparkPress, and the editorial director at SheReads. She has over 18 years’ experience in book and magazine editing and publishing, and in 2009 founded Midnight Publishing, an editorial company that helps authors develop their stories. In 2015 Lauren joined award-winning hybrid publishers SparkPress and She Writes Press, the latter of which won 2019 Independent Publisher of the Year. In 2021 she was elected to IBPA’s Advocacy Committee, and in her spare time, as an award-winning columnist, she is a journalism mentor to at-risk youth.

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It’s Time to Give Yourself a Break

“You’ve got one life to live, it’s time to get intentional with your wellbeing, beliefs & possibilities to create a life and business you are thriving in and passionate about!”  ~Meagan Saum

wellness, take a break, self care, meagan saum

“Sometimes, the most productive thing you can do is to relax.”

If you run a business and roll your eyes at taking time for yourself to unwind – you aren’t alone. 

Being able to relax and unwind away from work, family and life can help you become more productive. This is why it’s essential to learn to relax and make it a part of your daily routine. You can do many different things to relax and “check out,” and what works for one person may not work for another. It also doesn’t have to take hours and hours. So if you’re thinking, “I don’t have time for this,” I’m here to tell you that yes, you do! 

Many business owners feel they don’t have the luxury of time to take for themselves to focus on themselves. But I want you to think about it this way – when you take care of yourself, you’re also taking care of your business and your clients! Think of it as a form of maintenance. We maintain our homes, so they don’t break down. We have to keep our mental and physical health so we don’t break down, and therefore, our business doesn’t break down. 

I wanted to share a few things I feel are ways to practice self-care as a business owner. You may be surprised at the list (hint – it doesn’t include long, expensive days at the spa or sitting in a warm bubble bath waiting for the time to be up). 

Take breaks:

Every hour, make it a point to get up, walk away from your computer to stretch, and grab a drink of water or some food.

Delegate:

This one may take practice for some. It can be hard to delegate and pass up some control, but it’s important to ask for help when you need it. You need to be sure that you have a manageable amount of work on your plate. 

Block distractions:

The more you can focus on one thing at a time, the easier it will be to keep your stress levels down. For example, instead of jumping from task to task, or notification to notification, block out set times to check emails and messages. The more you can cut out distractions, the more productive you will be and the less stress you will feel.

Say no:

This one can be tricky. Many business owners will say yes to everything in the hope of pleasing clients and customers; however, often, when we say yes to everyone else, we are saying no to ourselves. Learn to say no to things that will cause stress and unhappiness and that don’t serve you. It’s essential to have boundaries within your business. 

Express gratitude:

In the hustle and grind of running a business, it’s easy to lose sight of all the reasons we have to feel happy. We’re fortunate to be busy and to be in business. Expressing gratitude to those around you who help, your clients, and yourself is an excellent form of self-care. 

Running a business is hard work. Start adding self-care to your daily routine, and you will find you are more productive and happy, and in turn, your clients will feel the same.

Meagan is a momma of 3 spirited kiddos, owner of a 320 acre working/wellness ranch, mindfulness centred psychotherapy practitioner, life coach, business coach, empowerment educator & entrepreneur of 17 years who loves to travel, spend time in nature, with her family/menagerie of animals as well relax with a tea & good book! 
Visit Meagan’s Website ~ Facebook ~ Instagram

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Do I Really Need to Write Everyday?

K. M. Weiland Debates the Pros and Cons of Writing Every Day.

Do You Have to Write Every Day? 10 Pros and Cons

Should writers make it a habit to write every day? Is that the secret to success? Is that what distinguishes “real” writers? I used to think so. Often, when someone would ask me for my single recommendation for other writers, my go-to response was to reiterate some form of the advice from Peter de Vries … Continue reading

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Learning Dog Tricks Made Me a Calmer Person

Writer, Cindy Zikmund talks about the words, “leave it”, and how they can be of benefit in our life.

While practicing the dog trick, Leave It, with my five-year old pup, I unexpectedly learned to regulate my own impulsive reactions and it couldn’t have come at a better time. 

During a live internet broadcast about COVID vaccinations sponsored by my employer, the typically cordial colleague-to-colleague chat turned hostile over the company’s vaccine requirement. Two years of isolating and conflicting information had transformed a professional, respectful organization of almost 20,000 employees into a battleground. We’d forgotten our manners, and shot four-letter words, insults, and outlandish accusations across the ether. 

My friend frequents Twitter and forwards the more polarizing discussions to a group text. Responses from our group hover around, “How can they think that?” or “What’s wrong with him/her/they?” Like my Zoom call at work, more people are publicly venting their rage and less people are understanding them. 

We’ve become a “type first, ask no questions later” society. 

Since the pandemic, I’ve been a remote worker. My rescue pup, Leo, stays near me all day. When the tone of a Zoom call changes, gets too loud, or the pitch goes too high, he sighs and walks to another room. I imagine him thinking,

“Why can’t they just Leave It?” 

Leo and I practice a “Leave It” exercise at night. I drop a dog treat on the floor and say the command. The appropriate response is for him to turn his head and ignore the salmon jerky. 

Leo is a Chow-Shepard mix, literally a chow hound. It’s challenging for him to control his food urges. But when he does, he gets a reward, two treats, one of higher more tasty value, and the first one I retrieve from the floor. 

This exercise has a grander purpose. When out for a walk and another dog appears, Leo’s protective instincts fire up, he growls, jumps, and pulls at his leash. But when I say, “Leave It,” he’s been reprogrammed to show no reaction except to look away. He’s not always successful and I sometimes forget to issue the command in time, but for the most part, the daily conditioning worked to control his natural impulse in a high stress situation, curbing his aggressive behavior. 

On the Zoom call where my colleagues flung word arrows at one another, my fingertips were poised to issue a zinger, but Leo’s reaction sidetracked me. He sensed the tension, snorted, and left me alone with my frustration. 

That hurt. 

Over the past twenty-four months, Leo and I have shared a daily routine, going from office to kitchen table and back throughout the day. We’re rarely separated and are always aware of the other’s location. When he walked away, a force took over. 

I had to make a choice. I could either type my snarky comment or leave my computer. 

At that moment of lift, the meeting moderator said to the inflamed crowd, “Take a breath. Step away from the keyboard.” 

Leo’s instincts had been correct. I exhaled, followed him to the kitchen, and gave him a dog treat and myself a chocolate. 

The heated exchange wasn’t what weighed heavy on my mind. It was realizing how frayed we all had become. More so than before, the behavior common on social media had seeped into our workplace, disrupting our core tenets of being inclusive and staying humble.  

I wanted to push a reset button and restore everyone back to 2019. 

Over the past two years, our collective mental health has been challenged. The Today Show recently aired a segment, “How Parental Burnout is Affecting Families.” Parents have had to become everything from elementary school teacher, caregiver, cleaner, emotional support, parent, and spouse. These demands have created a hidden risk to their wellbeing. To combat burnout, the advice given was to take a few minutes each day, have a comforting beverage, breathe deeply, and let the wave of anxiety pass. 

This reminded me of practicing Leave-it with my Chow-chow mix. 

I wondered if we could retrain ourselves the way I had retrained Leo. For each of us, the exercise will be different. For some, it might be deep breathing, for others it might be going for a run, or reserving time with your favorite drink at the end of the day. 

We can’t expect to miraculously transform overnight, and we can’t always take the high road when we’re feeling low. But we can set aside a little time each day to practice. And make sure we receive a high value reward the way Leo enjoyed his tasty treat plus one.

We may even find that the reward is simply knowing we can let things go. 

I made a promise to myself: to observe Mental Health Awareness Month. For all of May – and hopefully beyond – I promise to practice restoring the calm I once knew.  

It’s an old remedy. Be mindful. Do unto others. Count to ten before you speak/type. The reason these simple antidotes have lasted is because they work. Albeit we’re up against more severe circumstances and extreme stress than ever. 

Even more reason to stop for a moment each day and Leave It. 

Cyndie Zikmund’s essays have appeared in Cutleaf, Under the Gum Tree, Pink Panther Magazine, Magnolia Review, and The Literary Traveler. Her book reviews have been published by River Teeth, and Southern Review of Books and her poems by North Dakota Quarterly Review and In a Woman’s Voice. She has served as CNF Editor for Qu Literary Magazine. Cyndie has an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte, MBA from Santa Clara University, and BS EECS from UC Berkeley. 

Find her on the web at www.cyndiezikmund.com, Twitter, and Instagram

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Critique Group

An update on the WWW hosted Writing Critique Group from the coordinator of the group, Deborah Swenson. 

The response to the WWW Critique Group has been great, yet there are still some kinks to be worked out. As of now, we will start a waiting list for the WWW Critique Groups. If you are interested please complete the questionnaire on the WWW website which will then be forwarded to me. Make sure to include your email address. I would still like to limit individual group members to six. This may mean waiting until a spot opens up or a new group needs to be formed.

If there is anyone who has not yet had their initial contact with their group to set up a group start date please let me know.
Email me, Deborah Swenson at WWWCritiqueWritingGroup@gmail.com with any questions and concerns.

Thank you for your patience and understanding.

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New Release ~ The Road To Me by Laura Drake

 

Jacqueline Oliver is an indie perfumer, trying to bury her ravaged childhood by shoveling ground under her own feet. Then she gets a call she dreads—the hippie grandmother she bitterly resents was apprehended when police busted a charlatan shaman’s sweat lodge. Others scattered, but Nellie was slowed by her walker, and the fact that she was wearing nothing but a few Mardi-Gras beads. Jacqueline is her only kin, so like it or not, she’s responsible. 

Despite being late developing next year’s scent, she drops everything to travel to Arizona and pick up her free-range grandma. But the Universe conspires to set them on a Route 66 road trip together. What Jacqueline discovers out there could not only heal the scars of her childhood but open her to a brighter future.

Laura Drake is a New York and self-published published author of Women’s Fiction and Romance. Her debut, The Sweet Spot, was a double-finalist, then won the 2014 Romance Writers of America® RITA® award. She’s since published 12 more books. She is a founding member of Women’s Fiction Writers Assn, Writers in the Storm blog. 
Laura is a city girl who never grew out of her tomboy ways, or a serious cowboy crush. She gave up the corporate CFO gig to write full time. She realized a lifelong dream of becoming a Texan and is currently working on her accent. She’s a wife, grandmother, and motorcycle chick in the remaining waking hours.

Visit Laura’s Website, and forllow her on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram

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